St. George Slaying the Dragon
11 3/8 in. x 15 in.
Oil paint and 23 K gold leaf on poplar wood panel
 

This icon is characterisitic of the Novgorod school and shows an early Russian form of this motif. The background is simple without storytelling detail. St. George’s shield shows the pagan emblem of the sun.  Sun worship was widespread in pre-Christian Russia. The dragon represents Satan.

The Legend: "a terrible dragon had ravaged all the country round a city of Libya, called Selena, making its lair in a marshy swamp. Its breath caused pestilence whenever it approached the town, so the people gave the monster two sheep every day to satisfy its hunger, but, when the sheep failed, a human victim was necessary and lots were drawn to determine the victim. On one occasion the lot fell to the king's little daughter. The king offered all his wealth to purchase a substitute, but the people had pledged themselves that no substitutes should be allowed, and so the maiden, dressed as a bride, was led to the marsh. There St. George chanced to ride by, and asked the maiden what she did, but she bade him leave her lest he also might perish. The good knight stayed, however, and, when the dragon appeared, St. George, making the sign of the cross, bravely attacked it and transfixed it with his lance. Then asking the maiden for her girdle (an incident in the story which may possibly have something to do with St. George's selection as patron of the Order of the Garter), he bound it round the neck of the monster, and thereupon the princess was able to lead it like a lamb. They then returned to the city, where St. George bade the people have no fear but only be baptized, after which he cut off the dragon's head and the townsfolk were all converted. The king would have given George half his kingdom, but the saint replied that he must ride on, bidding the king meanwhile take good care of God's churches, honour the clergy, and have pity on the poor.”
.HERBERT THURSTON , The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VI

St. George is a soldier saint, who was later martyred by the Romans. Well loved by the crusaders, St. George became the patron saint of England.

 
To purchase this painting or to commission another Please use the Secure Shopping Cart system below.
Or you may email Illusion Studios at: contact@illusionstudios.net
Or telephone : 513-677-0504
 
AVAILABLE
$600.00

Price does not include shipping & handling.
If you order using the shopping cart system below but plan to pick up you purchase your shipping charge will be refunded at pick-up.